Superheroes and Philosophy: Truth, Justice, and the Socratic Way (Popular Culture & Philosophy #13) (Paperback)

Superheroes and Philosophy: Truth, Justice, and the Socratic Way (Popular Culture & Philosophy #13) By Tom Morris (Editor), Matt Morris (Editor), William Irwin (Editor) Cover Image

Superheroes and Philosophy: Truth, Justice, and the Socratic Way (Popular Culture & Philosophy #13) (Paperback)

By Tom Morris (Editor), Matt Morris (Editor), William Irwin (Editor)

$29.95


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The comic book superheroes -- Superman, Batman, the Incredible Hulk, the Fantastic Four, X-Men, and many others -- have proved to be a powerful and enduring thread in popular culture, a rich source of ideas for moviemakers, novelists, and philosophers. Superheroes and Philosophy brings together 16 leading philosophers and some of the most creative people in the world of comics, from storywriters to editors to critics, to examine the deeper issues that resonate from the hyperbolic narratives and superhuman actions of this heroic world. The comic book narratives of superheroes wrestle with profound and disturbing issues in original ways: the definitions of good and evil, the limits of violence as an efficacious means, the perils of enforcing justice outside the law, the metaphysics of personal identity, and the definition of humanity. The book also features original artwork specially commissioned from some of the most popular of today's comic book artists.

Product Details ISBN: 9780812695731
ISBN-10: 0812695739
Publisher: Open Court
Publication Date: April 20th, 2005
Pages: 281
Language: English
Series: Popular Culture & Philosophy

"Superman's costume always bugged me when I was a kid So you need a secret identity cool. But what’s the deal with all the rainbow-hued Spandex masks and costumes?... I found the answer to this great metaphysical dilemma in the book Superheroes and Philosophy, edited by Tom Morris and Matt Morris. In various essays, college philosophy professors and others ruminate on profound issues raised by the superhero lifestyle, such as how Batgirl reflects Nietzsche’s moral perfectionism." Rick de Yampert, Daytona Beach News-Journal, December 15, 2006