Mark

My staff picks are all over the map, but my special love is for science fiction and history.

 

If you could be any fictional character, who would you choose? Archie Goodwin---he has the best hats

Whats the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten? Lamb's eyes and couscous

If you could meet anyone, living or dead, who would you meet? Richard Feynman

What was your favorite cartoon growing up? Johnny Quest

What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever been for Halloween? The Invisible Man

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received? My partner

Are you a dog person or a cat person? Dog person

What’s your fondest childhood memory? Laughing uncontrollably with my parents

Read the rest of Mark's picks here.

Staff Pick Logo
The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9780062444134
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Voyager - July 5th, 2016

A debut novel that evokes the best of old- fashioned science fiction adventure and adds smart elements of satire, humor, and social commentary.  The crew of the Wayfarer, a bore ship that "punches" holes through subspace to connect distant locales in interstellar space via wormhole, is a collection of humans, aliens, alien humans, and an overseeing AI named Lovey.  Rosemary, who is fleeing family and hiding a secret, joins them and quickly discovers a new life that is both demanding and accepting in ways she never before imagined. The dialogue alone sets this novel a cut above. The characters are all fully realized, smart, and revealing in ways that bring us into their curious family, matching a wide and crowded universe as distinctly imagined as any in the genre.  An unexpected treat, built of equal parts intelligence, sensitivity, and an adult appreciation of the 12-year-old SF fan in all of us.


Staff Pick Logo
House of Windows Cover Image
$15.99
ISBN: 9781682308127
Availability: Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Diversion Publishing - Ips - July 11th, 2017

If H.P. Lovecraft and Saul Bellow had ever collaborated on a ghost story, the result might be very much like John Langan's debut novel House of Windows. Not so much in style, but in the way the two writers would temper each other and blend their signature motifs into something simultaneously more sinister and more sophisticated. Patiently, persistently, and with great skill, Langan has constructed a modern ghost story about nightmares and families and fouled hopes and expectations imposed and denied, with a caution at its heart, that no matter how many windows into the soul one has, if the curtains are drawn or we refuse to honestly look, we cannot truly know each other. Or ourselves.